Graphic equalizers

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Fearn
Member Since: Jan 27, 2006

Can anyone advise me what graphic equalizer to get. I have a basic home studio and I want an equalizer mainly for a microphone, but it cant be too costly, about 50. Can anyone help me????

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Hold 'Em Czar
Member
Since: Dec 30, 2004


Jan 27, 2006 04:58 pm

IMHO graphic eq's are useless for tracking purposes. mind if i ask why you want one? i'd just eq the track after it's been recorded....and any eq in that price range will likely add more noize than anything else.

my two scents

Pinnipedal Czar (: 3=
Member
Since: Apr 11, 2004


Jan 27, 2006 05:08 pm

I concour .
D'ga get those pics Chris ?

Answer:On a good day, lipstick.
Member
Since: Jun 24, 2004


Jan 27, 2006 05:08 pm

You need to fill out your profile a bit. "Basic Home Studio" can mean many things, to many people. Many here are using PC/Mac based recording apps; but there are many too with standalone recorders. Which do you have. Do you want a hardware EQ? If so, $50 isn't really going to get you very far. A small tube pre-amp might be a better investment. I have a Behringer MIC100, which are about fifty bucks. Adds the right noises. If you're using a computer based application, you might look at some of the free/inexpensive VST plug-ins available everywhere. I have one called Classic EQ which is very nice, and free.

I also found a used parametric rack mount that I use a lot. I find it more versatile than a graphic. Do you have any used gear stores near you? Try the classifieds.

Also, what is your microphone plugged into? Which microphone are you using? Are you using a mixer? I've found that too much EQ on a vocal can really kill the sound. Try for a transparent recording, to let the vocals be recorded as clear as possible. Then EQ a smidge once they're recorded if you really have to.

Just my 2cents worth.

Pinnipedal Czar (: 3=
Member
Since: Apr 11, 2004


Jan 27, 2006 05:27 pm

Sorry, that wasn't usefull .

Yeah, a pre-amp with a parametric may be more what you're looking for . Graphic eqing is more of an afterthought-application .

Fearn
Member
Since: Jan 27, 2006


Jan 27, 2006 06:23 pm

What I have is a laptop, it dont have a good sound card but its enuff. I just got a cheap music makin program which is alright but then there was no way of recording from say a synth, onto the laptop without real bad noise, i think my laptop is cheap.

So anyway, i bought a cheap multitrack recorder (zoom mrs4) and what I do is convert the music on the memory card to wav file then load it onto the program on the computer so its easier to arranger etc. The microphone is a Beta 58a, i read it was a good mic.

I suppose I could just record vocals then use the equalizer on the music program, but its not the best clarity.

Thanku for the replies :@

Pinnipedal Czar (: 3=
Member
Since: Apr 11, 2004


Jan 27, 2006 08:17 pm

I see now... alright, this is more likely an issue of your stock soundcard that you're trying to compensate for . The SM58 is a good mic, so chances are you'd get a nice(er) sound if you had an outbaord soundcard of some type, rather than a 'fixing it in the mix' type of cure .

Fearn
Member
Since: Jan 27, 2006


Jan 28, 2006 08:12 am

But if the mic is just hooked up to the multitrack with no effects added then it should sound as natural as it should???????Do they use effects and stuff in a proper studio for vocals or just use the mics direct sound???

Administrator
Since: Apr 03, 2002


Jan 28, 2006 08:46 am

That all totally depends on the singer and the song, each is different and has different needs.

Answer:On a good day, lipstick.
Member
Since: Jun 24, 2004


Jan 28, 2006 02:06 pm

Right. The Zoom unit probably has some pre-sets for vocals. Try to find the most natural sounding. My BR532 has a "Narrator" pre-set, which I've found is better that the highly compressed "singing" pre-sets. You may be able to turn them all off, and just get a very transparent sound.

bace135 in the house tonight!
Member
Since: Jan 28, 2003


Jan 28, 2006 03:14 pm

Quote:
Do they use effects and stuff in a proper studio for vocals or just use the mics direct sound???


They almost always use effects for vocals, especially compression and eq. They will often have some other effects as well such as reverb or chorus or delay, but this is more dependent on the style of music and the sound they are going for.

Administrator
Since: Apr 03, 2002


Jan 28, 2006 03:32 pm

Yeah, compression is pretty much a given on vocals...

Fearn
Member
Since: Jan 27, 2006


Jan 28, 2006 05:00 pm

The recorder does have some presets but its best to leave them off. So whats a compressor???what would be a good cheap one to get????

Pinnipedal Czar (: 3=
Member
Since: Apr 11, 2004


Jan 28, 2006 09:37 pm

A compressor evens-out the input signals amplitude . It 'compresses' the dynamics so that the quieter stuff is more audible, and the louder 'stuff' is more manageable .

A 'good cheap one' imo, is the dbx266xl . Nothing fancy, does what it should well . Then there's the Behringer models...

A hardware compressor is a very handy thing indeed .

Fearn
Member
Since: Jan 27, 2006


Jan 29, 2006 07:04 pm

Is the behringer MDX1400 any good??? or the minicom 800??????

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Jan 29, 2006 08:17 pm

Yes, the MDX1400 will work well for you. It is of course a discontinued model but should be easy enought o find on ebay or a used music instrument store. They are a good entry level unit and pretty straight forward to set up. The minicom as well is an even more entry level unit, cheap, easy to use right out of the box. Both units will work great but the 1400 is probably going to suit your needs longer.

Fearn
Member
Since: Jan 27, 2006


Jan 31, 2006 08:19 am

Ok so does a compressor automatically compress the signal and you are able to change attack and decay etc, or do you have to ajust those parameters to get a compression, if you know what I mean?

If you didnt use the knobs and stuff would and just passed the signal through the compressor would th signal be compressed? Iv got a ocmpressor on the music program but I odnt know how good it is, do you think its worth gettin a real one then??? my music isnt proffesional quality yet though.

Pinnipedal Czar (: 3=
Member
Since: Apr 11, 2004


Jan 31, 2006 10:30 am

There are compressors out there with a 'preset' attack and release settings, though the brand escapes me . Most have a bypass feature .

The compressor on your music program, should work in the same manor as a hardware unit, albiet AFTER the process of recording . The benefit of compressing the signal on the way in is that it helps manage the transients that may otherwise clip your recording input .

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