building a project studio

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Bane of All Existence
Member Since: Mar 27, 2003

it looks like we're going to get our hands on a 12x20 storage area, and we're thinking about building a control room in it. we've got to build a room within a room to soundproof it, so we figured that we'd take a corner out of it so that we could set up gear and perhaps make a bit of cash recording some friends as well.

so far, we're just planning to use drywall, 2x4s, the pink insulation stuff, caulking, and some kind of relatively soundproof window unit to accomplish this. we're on a limited budget, and none of us have done this before. does anyone have any low-cost suggestions?

i'm also wondering how people transfer XLR and 1/4" signals from the live room to the control room. is there some kind of wall plate that i can get?

thanks :-)

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a.k.a. Porp & Mr. Muffins
Member
Since: Oct 09, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 02:24 pm

There are XLR and TRS wall plates available that look just like electrical outlets. That with a combination of cord snakes should do the trick I suppose. That's all I know on this subject...

Contributor
Since: Sep 09, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 02:30 pm

for that window, maybe double panes of plexiglass? leave a few inches between them to capture sound, and try not to fix them parallel to each other, like lean one inwards of something. it will trap sound in between them

Maniacal Genius
Contributor
Since: Dec 30, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 03:31 pm

There is some good info on this topic at www.acoustics101.com

Bane of All Existence
Member
Since: Mar 27, 2003


Jun 19, 2003 03:36 pm

jamie - i was reading a soundproofing book, and they said that in terms of soundproofing ability, you have to measure that gap between two materials by its shortest distance and use that as the factor for how much noise will be stopped. i hear what you're saying about the uneven sound trapping stuff. does that apply to that type of application or just within a room itself?

thanks guys, you're a lot of help.

Contributor
Since: Sep 09, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 04:06 pm

i dunno.. i'm reading that acoustics101 site that blue linked to, and they mention hardly anything about using non-parallel walls etc.

Maniacal Genius
Contributor
Since: Dec 30, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 04:10 pm

There is some info on Acoustics101 about non-parallel walls. Basically, unless you REALLY know what you're doing, you shouldn't try it. However, using a non-parallel configuration for the window is a good idea and most every one I've ever seen has been done that way. There should be ample info on that site about how to do it, but if you need more, let me know.

Bane of All Existence
Member
Since: Mar 27, 2003


Jun 19, 2003 04:41 pm

www.acoustics101.com/components_gateway.htm

Under "CONTROL & ISO ROOM DOUBLE-PANE WINDOWS"

"You want a double window between your control room and studio because single-paned windows are very poor at stopping sound. You want to try to keep the panes parallel to each other to maximize the dead air space between them and you donít want to use three panes (that's an old wives' tale) because using three panes actually lessens the contiguous dead air space. If you must angle your glass, angle only one pane, not both, and make it a slight angle."

Maniacal Genius
Contributor
Since: Dec 30, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 05:38 pm

Strange. Well, I guess the jury's out on that still then. I must not have noticed this passage when I read it. I guess you'll have to do some further research and make a decision based on your findings. My research revealed that non-parallel was the way to go, but Acoustics101 says different. The information they have is pretty good, but it is of course geared toward selling Auralex products. I don't think that would have any effect on their suggestions for the window though. Let me know what you find out. Now, I'm really curious which way works better.

Bane of All Existence
Member
Since: Mar 27, 2003


Jun 19, 2003 06:09 pm

yeah it's an interesting point. as i mentioned above, i was reading a book when i stopped at the library to check this stuff out. it said that when it comes to the dead air between two solids principle, the window/wall/whatever is only as effective as the shortest distance between those two solids. so if it's 4" at the top and 3" at the bottom, it's only 3" in reality.

what a quandary!

Maniacal Genius
Contributor
Since: Dec 30, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 06:56 pm

I believe the idea behind using non-parallel panes for a window is so that when sound penetrates the first pane, it, doesn't reflect directly back and forth between the two panes. Having the two panes non-parallel causes the sound to "bounce around" inside the dead space hence allowing less of the sound to actually penetrate out through the other side. Now, I certainly don't have the proper education to support or deny this, but it "seems" to make sense to some degree. I'll do some more research on this topic and you do the same. Between us, we can come up with a good, inexpensive solution.

Administrator
Since: Apr 03, 2002


Jun 19, 2003 07:23 pm

That is pretty much the theory behind everything being non-parallel, panes, doors, walls...everything. It keeps sound waves from bouncing directly back and forth and cancelling each other out.

If parallel walls and such are not feasible, the next logical solution is putting furniture, like bookshelves, chairs and such in corners diagonally to minimize the bass traps that exists in corners and keep sound bouncing. If using bookshaleves, it's also good to have books on them of all different sizes.

Another solution is building a piece of plywood to hang on the wall that has all differetn lengths of 2x4's or 4x4's screwed to it and hang it on the wall like a picture.

Much of these ideas and more are discussed in several articles in the Do-It-Yourself section of HRC.

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer
Member
Since: May 10, 2002


Jun 20, 2003 08:33 am

Non parallel construction limits resonation. For example with the two panes of glass. The pane on the side of the recording room will vibrate from the music being played. As it vibrates it will move the air inbetween the panes of glass which will vibrate the second pane on the side of the control room. If the panes are parallel they will resonate and have a greater tendency to vibrate each other more. If they are slightly non parallel the sound waves will bounce like a bank shot on a pool table and the vibrations will disipate in the space between the panes instead of resonate. This theory can be carried over to every aspect of the studio. Parallel walls / ceiling floor, etc. Double walls are very cool to if you can afford the extra 2x4's and space. You still need only sheet the outsides of the double wall construction.

Eat Spam before it eats YOU!!!
Member
Since: May 11, 2002


Jun 20, 2003 10:02 am

... actually if I remember right the nonparalell glass has nothing to do with sound transmission but lessens the "mirror" effect you'll get when you try to look though it...

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