Far Field and Near Field Monitor Speaker

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nobody is perfect
Member Since: Oct 15, 2004

Hi fellow musicians,
Does anybody know and can share me about what is farfield and nearfield speaker monitors? whats the different and the function of it?

thanks

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Administrator
Since: Apr 03, 2002


Dec 27, 2004 06:16 am

Near field monitors are speakers that are meant to be placed within a few feet of your head, 6 feet being about average, "farfield", a term that I have never actually heard, are large format speakers that should be much farther from your ears as the full sound takes longer to develop.

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer
Member
Since: May 10, 2002


Dec 27, 2004 09:13 am

I am starting to see these terms pop up here and there. Near, Mid, and Far field monitors. I would guess dB is correct. Myself, being the synical like type person I am sometimes just figgured some company is trying to off something that didn't quite measure up. You know if it isn't right call it a 'feature' and double the price!

Member
Since: Sep 11, 2004


Jan 02, 2005 04:45 pm

nearfield monitors are, like dB said, meant to be close to the listener. This direct line of sound eliminates room acoustics, which can seriously alter the sound you hear. "farfield" monitors are used in pro studios, and they are mounted on the walls, at least a metre or two away from the listener. These speakers are designed for room acoustics. The problem with farfield monitors is that you have to build the room as a studio. The acoustics of the room have to be taken into account, so that they don't distort the sound you get from your monitors; you cant just stick them in any room and have them work.

Because designing a studio in your home from scratch isn't a possibility for most people, nearfield monitors are far more popular.

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Jan 02, 2005 09:11 pm

Well I hate to dissagree here but room acoustics do matter even with nearfield moniters!

Room acoustics are takin into consideration no matter what size the speaker is. Sound waves bounce off the walls and what not even if you are using tiny little PC speakers, and the room does make a differance in how they sound.

And yes farfield, or large format moniters can be built in but are not always built into the walls. That is mostly for asthetics or space needs.

Large format are generally used when doing film scoring or possibly when tracking some synth tracks or other scratch type tracks right in the mixxing room. I know when I use large format it is when recording synth tracks or what not direct to feel a bit more of the live performance then you get with nearfield moniters. I know with a lot of the synth tracks I do, I do prefer it a bit ouder to feel the music so to speak.

bace135 in the house tonight!
Member
Since: Jan 28, 2003


Jan 02, 2005 09:27 pm

This is of interest to me as well. I just recently got some nearfields, but have close to zero room for them without completely re-arranging my room. So, I set them up on a surface about 10 ft behind where I would position myself during mixing. Can't use them yet (due to me needing a power amp), but does anyone see anything blatantly wrong with this?

Member
Since: Sep 11, 2004


Jan 02, 2005 10:13 pm

okay okay noise, room acoustics DO matter =P, but there are significantly less variables with nearfield.

First off, you and the two monitors should make an equilateral triangle. That means that the distance between the speakers should be the same as the distance from the listener to each speaker. This setup allows the listener to be in the "sweet spot" of the speaker. It's a must.

Next up is the surroundings of the speaker. If the speaker is against a wall, or in a corner, adjustments will have to be made. If you get a good pair of monitors, they'll have some sort of switches on the back that you can play with. My behringer 2030A's have switches for both wall and corner setups. If you're going to have your monitors in a tight space like that, make sure you buy monitors that have adjustments for it. Your best bet is to have the monitors in a free field environment, which means no walls close to the speaker.

Now, i have a question. Is it important to have some sort of dampening material under the monitors? My monitors dont have any "feet", so they sit flush with my desk. Maybe i should put some rubber under them so vibrations are absorbed?

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Jan 02, 2005 10:31 pm

Well realistically they should not be more then about 6 feet from you. But that said, to make the best of the situation I would make sure for vest results you set everything up in an equal triangle. You really want the moniters to be about the same distance apart as they are space from you. In my case I sit about 5 feet back from mine, as they are spaced about 5 feet apart center to center.

One of the most important things is to make sure they are setting at about ear level. In my case again, they are just a bit above ear level so they are angled a bit down to give me the best stereo sweet spot.

You want to make sure you are in the center of the sonic picture they are dispersing. Or as close as possible to the center of it.

They should be angled in to point at your head as if your head is the center point of the triangle. That will give the best stereo image.

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Jan 02, 2005 10:50 pm

Oh yes indeed, thanx for bringing that up kamikaze. Dampening under the moniters will really help eliminate some of the low end resonance that they can cause sitting on a hard surface. Or any even semi solid surface for that matter. So yes indeed, de-coupleing the moniters from a shelf or solid desk top will help imensely. I know dB uses a pair of stands made just for that purpose. I also use them for my speakers in my living room down hear to decouple them and give a better sonic picture. But a semi soft rubber will do nicely. And as well I know many peeps who have used several differant techniques including but not limited to putting 3 pebble's under them to lift them off the desk. The main idea is to limit the amouunt of actual speaker surfce or hard surface that is in contact with the shelf or desk top.

As for the KRK moniters coolo is using, they are what I use. They are front ported so being near a backing wall is not an issue. That is the main reason I switched to them is the front end porting. All the KRK moniters, even the large format type are front ported for this reason. They paint a better sonic picture of the low end when being used in tight spaces or with a back wall in close proximity.

bace135 in the house tonight!
Member
Since: Jan 28, 2003


Jan 03, 2005 12:02 am

out of curiosity, what is the minimum distance one should set nearfield monitors away from oneself when mixing?

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Jan 03, 2005 12:21 am

Well most agree it depends on room size. I am partial myself to the theory of 4 to 6 feet as being the best zone for them. That is what helps keep the direct sound more present when sitting in the sweet spot.

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