hepl me buy a kick *** compy

Posted on

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member Since: Nov 27, 2007

hello all,
Im wanting to buy a kick buttocks compy. Im using an iMac right now, but 1 i cant upgrade it

and 2 im not paying the over the top amount for a mac that will be worth half the price a soon as i walk it out the door.

For the price i can sell my current Mac, i can almost buy a brand new insanely powerful PC built for the job.

I want to be able to run my multitude of effects, amps sims, chiors sims, and ezdrummer whilst running the thing on a very low latency while i record vocals and other stuff.

To be honest my Imac "almost" does it, but is just starting to whine and drop out on a low latency while running all the above mentioned. (which is fair enough)

So can someone steer me in the right direction here?
Im by no means a computer buff so i'll need a specific, either model or parts names so i can build or buy.

It will only be for Music recording mostly and im assuming buliding is proly a better option so as to be custom for my needs.
quad core comes to mind but as long as its going to be powerful enough.
If there's one thing ive learnt with this stuff, its get what you need right off the bat and save all the mucking around.

cheers.

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Member
Since: Jul 02, 2003


Sep 03, 2010 03:55 pm

I used to build my own computers but the last 2 I've just bought HP Pavilion's and added my Delta44 for sound. My current one is a Q6600 Quad Core which was around $1100 and pretty much handles anything I throw at it. Bang for the buck I think HP's are really good computers. I regularly have 7 or 8 instances of GR4 or Amplitube 3 in a typical project plus Jamstix, EZD, or SD2 and other assorted plugins and 25+ tracks. The current i7 machines would do even better. The biggest problem I have these days isn't CPU power, just not enough memory and I don't want to go 64 bit yet, I still have a couple important plugin's I use that don't support it. :)

Dan

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 03, 2010 08:03 pm

see these are the things i havent learnt about yet, the 64 bit part.
I really need to learn, so i know what im looking for to buy.

I think atm im using say 4 continuos guitar sim tracks, SD2 (EZD) some spiratic amp sim fill tracks, a small track part of EW symphonic choirs VST, and an amp sim bass track.

Im running all those and wanting to have my latency at 192 for recording (on a mac) which is low, how low? gimme 2 secs will go have a squiz.....4.35 input. and 26 odd for output.

Mind you sd2 is pretty loaded with onboard compressors, eq and all that.

So i dont wanna get caught out again with either not enough ram or cpu or this or that, coz really im not entirely sure about or or the other of those.
I got more ram for my mac but then someone said ah nah man you need a better cpu, other wise you cant use your ram effectively enough.

so you know just wanna get all that done and dusted so i dont have to look down this road again for a while.

will have a look at the one you have mentioned there OD.
But if someone can sorta rattle off what specs i might be looking for for this that be good. i might even go get one today.

geez then i will be back here again asking what OS to use and what background services to turn off to get it running proper.

Prince CZAR-ming
Member
Since: Apr 08, 2004


Sep 03, 2010 08:25 pm

Quote:
geez then i will be back here again asking what OS to use and what background services to turn off to get it running proper.


Yep, you will =)

Here's a guy that's been on the reaper boards that really seems to know his stuff. give him an email, and or stop by his site, i'm sure he'll be more than happy to help you out.

Here's one of his posts:
[quote]If you want to work effectively at ultra low latency settings (ASIO buffer sizes of 64-samples or less)... running substantial loads, then your machine as a whole needs to be up to the task.

-DPC Latency needs to be low/consistent
-An i5/i7 CPU is a major plus (memory controller on the CPU itself)
-If you're using lots of soft-synths, a socket-1366 based machine is a plus due to the bandwidth from triple-channel RAM
-Fast HDs (each sustaining 120+MB/Sec)
-The audio interface (quality of its driver) also has a profound impact on performance/stability

mATX motherboards can be more problematic...
That said, you can build a very high performance mATX machine.
I built a custom Cube (mATX) for playing live... and it absolutely smokes.
I run about a dozen of the better soft-synths/samplers (including Kontakt 4, Omnisphere, etc) at a 64-sample ASIO buffer size... and the little Cube delivers massive disk-streaming polyphony (256+ glitch-free voices).
I put two 1TB (64MB cache) HDs in RAID-0 for streaming samples.
It's crazy fun! You can load anything you want/need (splits/layers)... step on the sustain pedal and gliss up/down the keyboard like mad.
All completely glitch-free at a 64-sample ASIO buffer size.
It's not unlimited power... but it almost feels like it.

__________________
Jim Roseberry
www.studiocat.com
jim@studiocat.com
[/quote]


http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 03, 2010 08:33 pm

cheers PJK will do.

Tim the Enchanter
Member
Since: Feb 17, 2008


Sep 03, 2010 08:44 pm

As far as the 64 bit thing goes, I ended loading Windows 7 64 bit (when you buy it, it comes with both the 32 bit and 64 bit version). You can still use 32 bit software with your 64 bit Windows. But I don't think SD2 works with the 64 bit version of Cubase (although I could be wrong), so I ended up loading the 32 bit version of Cubase. It still seems to run pretty smooth even though I only have a AMD dual core. When running 64 bit, you can take advantage of the extra memory. 32 bit software only uses up to around 3.2 GB of memory. 64 bit will allow you to exceed that limit.

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 03, 2010 10:04 pm

what do you think of this?
cgi.ebay.com.au/Apple-Mac...=item1e5dfe78d0

Its mac

Member
Since: Jul 02, 2003


Sep 04, 2010 02:16 am

I think you'd really be better off finding a newer i5/7 machine. If your preference is for mac that's fine but dollar for dollar you're generally going to get a higher performance machine with a PC.

Of the plug's you're using SD2 is the main performance killer mainly due to it's ram requirements for alot of the kits, I've pretty much stopped using it as I can get just as good a sound out of EZD, Jamstix etc, with far less impact on my memory requirements. As far as compressors/eq those really don't use much CPU or ram at all, you could run ton's of those even on your current system. On my system for recording I use a 128 or 256 sample buffer which is low enough latency, during mixing I up it to around 512+ samples since latency doesn't matter. On the new i5/7 machines you could probably easily run a 64-128 sample buffer for most projects.

Most new machines are using Win7 64bit, or offer the option and as long as the plugin's you have support 64 bit you're good to go. Both Sonar & Cubase support 32 bit plugin's in their 64 bit DAW's though I've heard Cubase bit bridge is pretty iffy, Sonar's works pretty well with most 32bit plugin's but you're best bet is to make sure you have or can get 64 bit versions of the plugin's you use. SD2 & EZD have 64bit versions, I don't know about EW.

The triple channel memory on the newer systems is a plus, but not a deal breaker if it doesn't have it in my opinion, a good audio interface & fast disks are most important.

If you go with a PC the OS choice is easy Win7 smokes XP & Vista, and XP isn't even in the running if want to go 64 bit.

I was thinking about getting a new PC myself, but can't really justify it right now since my current system handles everything I need to do and can run 64bit Windows when I'm ready and that will solve the memory problems I run into these days.

Dan

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 04, 2010 01:15 pm

OD and Redneck, thanks man's, i apprectiate the info.
Im just dunno what im gonna do at this point now, was recording some stuff tonight, kept crashing and being a pain in the crackola.

I definately need an upgrade, gotta work out what, in the next week.

I would like to go Mac quad, new, but gotta sell this other thing first. might get 900AUD for it.
Will see how **** goes, hey... will keep ya posted tho.

Thanks again.

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 04, 2010 07:43 pm

one other thing i was thinking of,

I know a Mac can run windows, but if a PC could run Snow Leopard, would it operate the same then as a Mac????

That, would be a very good thing.

Member
Since: Jul 02, 2003


Sep 04, 2010 07:46 pm

I don't know, I think Apple has made that difficult if not impossible for the average user.

Dan

Czar of Turd Polish
Member
Since: Jun 20, 2006


Sep 07, 2010 05:17 pm

Yes a PC can run Snow Leopard, it is not easy to set up but not really hard either, just very involved. Just look up hackintosh.

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 08, 2010 04:16 am

well isnt the whole issue using a PC for recording windows? all the **** things it does etc?
wouldnt it be easier to use Snowy?

Thanks Cap, i think i will look into this more now. I dont necessarily want Mac as such, just to be able to keep using Leopard or S.L so i dont have to gin around with windows.

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 08, 2010 04:18 am

though the pc will still run the same as a Pc wont it?
I'll still have to fart around turning off this and that?

Member
Since: Jul 02, 2003


Sep 10, 2010 01:03 am

I think you'll find Leopard has just as much stuff running in the background as Win7 and you'll have problems with sofware just as you might on Win7. If you don't believe me spend some time on the forums of companies that support both, you'll find just as many Mac users complaining as Windows users.

It's not the OS that is the problem it's the software developers, releasing stuff before it's really ready to meet deadlines, and in the case of DAW's the multitude of plugin's that the software has to work with, audio devices etc, many of which have bug's of there own, it's a wonder any of it works. About they time they all finally get things going stable, they release a new version and it starts all over again. :)

I'm not against either OS/Computer, just saying the grass ain't neccesarily greener. ;)

Dan

http://www.reverbnation.com/2ndg
Member
Since: Nov 27, 2007


Sep 10, 2010 04:01 am

cool OD, thats makes things seema bit better.,
I just had real bad experiences with PC's when i first started recording, that due lack of knowledge, ****house gear and brand new cubase software.

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