Backing Up On CD many questions

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Member Since: Mar 13, 2003

I have a question on backing up large Bundle files from Cakewalk . I guess this might apply to any program.

Anyway I found reference on some boards to saving the stuff on to CD as DATA rather than AUDIO.

Can someone please tell me the difference?
And if I have Windows XP and Cakewalk HS XL will I get some prompt that will make me choose?

I'm not trying to Burn a CD, just trying to backup using CD as a temporary fix until I can get a big external hard drive.

Specifically on Cakewalk- would regularly saving during a session on my main drive as a .WRK file; then backing up every night on the CD drive as a .BUN be a prudent way to go about it.?

I've seen proponents both for and against .WRK's and .BUN's so I want to keep it all covered..

Question on the actual blank CDs I buy at the store, do they need to be anything special? My Windows XP Help notes says they need to be "writable". So, in the store is there going to be like a thousand different types to wade through? Like "Writable", "non-writable", "audio", "data", etc..?

thanks

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Contributor
Since: Sep 09, 2002


Apr 11, 2003 06:04 pm

i'm still confused with when i should be using .WRKs and when i should use .BUNs so now that i have an 80GB HD i just always save to BUNs. They're huge, I know :O(. They contain all of th audio data. I would think that alternately saving WRKs and BUNs woul double the disk space used since each track would end up in your temp folder and in the BUN as well.

as for audio versus data, no problem. An audio CD would be the kind that you can playback on your home stereo. If you're buring BUN file then you're def burning a data disc.

As for which discs to use, avoid "Audio" or "Music" CD-Rs, not because they different, but because they cost more. All you have to worry about is CD-R (recordable once) and CD-RW (re-writable over and over again) and 74 min (650MB) and 80min (700 MB).

For my archive purposes, sometimes I use CD-Rs and sometimes I use CD-RWs ::shrugs:: It's up to you -j

Member
Since: Mar 13, 2003


Apr 11, 2003 06:38 pm

I've just read somewhere that CD-RW's are "unreliable", and that its safer to save on to cheapo CDR's with EVERY SAVE.
Any thoughts on that anyone?
thanks

bace135 in the house tonight!
Member
Since: Jan 28, 2003


Apr 11, 2003 06:47 pm

So, I can't answer all of these questions, but I can answer a couple of them. For instance:

Saving to audio is the process you would use to burn a music CD. I believe the CD gets formatted a certain way so that most home audio/car CD players can read them. But when you save data files on a CD you are saving the files as a computer would read them. Saving as data is like using the CD as a one time only floppy disk. I'm not familiar with Cakewalk yet, but you usually choose how to burn through your CD writing software (for instance Easy CD Creator).

If you are going to be regularly burning CDs as backup, you may want to go with CD-RWs. These CDs can be erased and re-written (where the RW comes from) many times. Otherwise you will need a big stack of CD-R (CD-R and CD-RW are two different products). There are many variations of the CD-R with each being optimized for certain applications, but there is not really that much difference between them.

I don't know anything about .WRK or .BUN files

bace135 in the house tonight!
Member
Since: Jan 28, 2003


Apr 11, 2003 06:51 pm

hmmm,
I got distracted and by the time I finished the post Jamie had stolen all my ideas plus some I hadn't even thought of yet. smiles.

Contributor
Since: Sep 09, 2002


Apr 11, 2003 07:05 pm

i tend to archive to CD-R lately. I've never hear anything about CD-RWs being "unreliable", but then again, as someone on another board mentioned, I don't get out much. CD-Rs are certainly alot cheaper than RWs. Just stick with the name brands. I use Verbatim and TDK almost exclusively. I also frequent IBM and Imation. Never had an problems with those names. But I have had bad luck with Hypermedia, PNY, DataSafe and other Staples discount brands and believe it or not *Memorex*! I had several bad packs of Memorex and so did my friend. The silkscreens flaked off! Cheap CD-Rs are prone to have the printed silkscreen surface flake and chip away. If the silkscreen side gets scratched or otherwise damaged it's almost always an irreversable loss of data.

I recommend you experiment first. Buy a trusted namebrand pack of CD-Rs and run off some data onto them, then try and retrieve that data on your machine and on your friend's/coworker's machine etc. Throw the disc around the room. beat on it with a ruler. Does it still read? Try and scratch off the silkscreen with your fingernails. Try writing on it with alcohol based markers (a usual no-no) and see how easily the silkscreen melts. Bend it until it almost break and check and see if the silkscreen is beginning to lift off of the foil or plastic. Did you make an obvious stress cracks in the plastic? Put the disc thru heck and then see if it still reads. If it can handle your abuse, then it can handle your careful use -j

Contributor
Since: Sep 09, 2002


Apr 11, 2003 07:06 pm

heh, but I wrote that post an hour ago! :O)

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer
Member
Since: May 10, 2002


Apr 12, 2003 01:12 pm

The answers are all covered already, but sometimes it helps to put it just a little differently and between all of the right answers things get clear.

CD or audio disks are formated for playing on an Audio CD player e.g. home stereo, car stereo. Most burning software will give you the option to make either an audio disk or a data disk. When you choose to burn an audio disk the MP3 or wav or Aif files you enter into the burning software are converted to specialy formated files to work on a CD player.

If you choose to make a data disk, no changes are made to the files. They are simply burned to a CDR or CDRW (your choice) in the same format they are saved to a hard disk drive. That way you can retrieve them later with your audio application from the CDR or CDRW instead of the hard disk.

CDRW's do have limitations on how many times they can be "burnt over" just like old 3.5" diskettes. Eventually they will loose reliability.

So to back up your files, choose make a data disk in the software. Transfer all of the files that your application needs for the project you want to back up. Burn them to a CDR or CDRW. To test the CDR or CRDW, start your application and open the files from the CDR or CDRW.

One limitation. When you save the files to a CDR or CDRW they will be marked as "read only" files. This means that you can not save changes of the files back to the CDR or CDRW. Some applications will simply prompt you to rename them indicating that you need to choose a new name and save the changed files to the hard disk drive. Some applications do not know how to deal with this problem and will complain about the read only files. In this case you will need to copy the files from the CDR or CDRW to your hard disk drive. Go into each file properties on the HD and remove the "read only" check.

Last there is no physical difference between a data CD and an audio CD. CDR's and CDRW's differ only in available space, burn speeds, and quality of manufacturing process.

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Apr 12, 2003 02:16 pm

And just to clarify about the differance between .wrk and .bun files. The bundle file is actually smaller then the srk file would be if it cantained audio tracks. The .bun file actually keeps all the audio, midi and control information all in one file as opposed to the wrk file leaving the audio in another folder, seperate from the actual file. The bun file will indeed save space as opposed to the wrk file. And when you get to Sonar 2.2, they have implemented a very goo file storage system.

Member
Since: Mar 13, 2003


Apr 13, 2003 01:02 am


Everyone- I really appreciate all this help. Forgive me but I am befuddled. Please clarify something for me. I have been reading and searching for this simple answer and I think the answer is so common-sense that no one addresses it! (yowch)

All I want to do is have a good backup routine. One minute I think I should get an external hard drive and the next I think I should backup on CD. I know I will eventually do both...

I don't need to burn Audio CD's yet, I just need to backup as Data on to the CD drive. I have Windows XP, and a Dell 2350. Is everyone using the term "burning" generically ? Some say "save" and some say "burn". This is driving me crazy.

Like I said I have Windows XP and I'm just trying to back up big 300-400 meg. "bundle" files from Cakewalk.

I don't have a CD burner, just the average Dell CD-ROM thing on my PC tower.

Main question: can't I just pop in a CD-RW disc into the thing and save it? Just as if it were a disk in the A: drive or something? Do I really need CD burning software? This is temporary but I can't wait. (I am researching all my external hard drive options now)

A very simple answer would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for your patience

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Apr 13, 2003 01:11 am

If it is only called a CD-ROM drive, it is not a CD burner, recorder, or whatever you wish to call it. If it is a CD-RW drive then you will be able to write data to a a CD, ie:burn it to a CD. I personally use swapable drive bays which use your normal everyday hard disk drive. You simply back up your data files tha that drive and remove it from the bay. this is an option as opposed to the external drives you are looking at.

Member
Since: Mar 13, 2003


Apr 13, 2003 01:28 am


Aha ! I see completely now... Looks like I'm on to external Hard drive searching ASAP

thanks alot

Czar of Midi
Administrator
Since: Apr 04, 2002


Apr 13, 2003 02:03 am

good hunting then.

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